BRITISH CURRICULUM

CAMPUSES OFFERING: CITY CENTER | KHALIDIYA

The  7 Areas of Learning and Development -  A Guide for Parents

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) has seven areas of learning and development which have been produced by the English government and Early Years Professionals for the use by all Early Years providers, FS1 and FS2.

We use the areas of learning and development when we observe, assess and plan for your individual child’s needs.  The areas of learning and development make sure that we are constantly challenging your child and helping them to develop and succeed.

There are 7 areas of learning and they are split into 2 parts:

THE 3 PRIME AREAS

– Which are for all children and will always be the main focus of planning and specifically for children under 3

 

PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This area of learning and development is about how your child..

  • Is confident and self assured
  • Manages their feelings and behaviours
  • Makes friends
  • Shares and takes turns

 

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

This area of learning and development is about how your child..

  • Moves and uses gross motor skills
  • Develops fine motor skills
  • Learns about healthy living
  • Manages self care independently
 

COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE

This area of learning and development is about how your child..

  • Listens and pays attention
  • Understands what is being said
  • Communicates with others
  • Develops vocabulary and speech

THE 4 SPECIFIC AREAS

– which are mostly used for the older children, but are also relevant for younger children.

 

LITERACY

This area of learning and development is about how your child..

  • Enjoys reading books
  • Likes making marks
  • Learns to write
  • Starts to explore phonics and letter sounds

MATHEMATICS

This area of learning and development is about how your child..

  • Learns about numbers and counting
  • Recognises the passing of time
  • Explores, measures, capacity, space, shapes, opposites etc, during play

UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD

This area of learning and development is about how your child..

  • Finds out about nature and the world around them
  • Talks about people and their local community and learns about similarities and differences
  • Learns to confidently use ICT equipment

ART AND DESIGN

This area of learning and development is about how your child..

  • Enjoys being creative
  • Sings, dances and makes music
  • Plays imaginatively
  • Uses color to express themselves
 

BUG CLUB

What makes Bug Club so special?

Bug Club is our core reading program from Foundation Stage to Year 6 (ages 4-11). It offers books and eBooks and an online learning world that is engaging and imaginative for our young readers. Shown to:

  • encourage reluctant readers to read at home using the online reading world
  • increase reading enjoyment
  • develop skills

What’s in Bug Club?

  • Finely-levelled reading books to help improve children’s reading attitudes. 
  • An online reading world that our pupils love. Children can read their allocated eBooks at school or at home and earn rewards as they read, to spend in their Bug Club world. 

ENGLISH

At International Community School City Centre, we explicitly teach speaking and listening, reading and writing. Our aim is to develop children’s knowledge, skills, and understanding in English and ensure that the children then transfer these skills into all subjects.

Our aim is to develop children’s communication, language and essential English skills. We ensure that they have the ability to listen, speak, read and write for a wide range of purposes. Working together with others leads to the wider development of social relations, which include friendship, empathy and sharing emotions linking to our school values and competencies, we encourage the children to express themselves creatively and imaginatively. 

Speaking and Listening

Spoken Language underpins the development of reading and writing, therefore, our English Curriculum is designed to continually develop children’s confidence and competence in speaking and listening skills. We focus on developing the capacity to explain their understanding of books and other reading, to prepare their ideas before they write, and as well as teaching them to understand and use the conventions for discussion and debate.

Reading

We are extremely proud of the way we teach Phonics and Reading in school, and are committed to developing ‘Balanced Readers’. We have a wonderful bank of reading resources which support readers at all levels and reflect the international nature of our school. The school strives to promote a love of reading throughout the whole school, from Foundation Stage to Year 6. 

Writing

In Writing, it is important that children are exposed to a wide range of different text types. We support children to increase their ability to use planning, drafting and editing to improve their work and the work of their peers. A balance of modeled, guided and independent strategies are used to support and extend learning. This approach is highly supportive to all children. Writing is assessed regularly and teachers effectively use assessment information to inform planning to ensure that children are always meeting their full potential.

HUMANITIES AND ART

History

Learning about the past and the methods used to study it helps pupils make sense of the world in which they live. They are introduced to what is involved in understanding and interpreting the past and this helps them to establish their own ideas, beliefs and values and to form an understanding as to why the world is as it is. As well as developing knowledge of the past the children learn historical skills which help them understand and interpret historical information. Where appropriate, cross-curricular links such as ICT and drama help to consolidate the pupils’ understanding. There is a general progression of chronological study from modern times to Ancient Egyptian times as the children move through the school.

Geography

Geography is taught through topics that focus on environmental issues, the study of places and the human and physical processes which shape them and the people who live in them. Skills and knowledge are taught through first -hand experience wherever possible allowing children to develop appropriate fieldwork skills. There is a general progression of countries/ areas studied being further away from the UAE as the children move through the school.

Art and Design

We aim to develop each child’s creativity and imagination through a range of visual, tactile and sensory experiences. These opportunities help them to understand and respond to the world by expressing their ideas and feelings.

In Key Stage 1 the children begin to develop an understanding of colour, form, texture and pattern through a variety of media including paint, clay, textiles, and sculpture. During Key Stage 2 children build on their knowledge, skills and understanding of materials and processes through a wide range of experiences including visits to art galleries, museums and workshops. By exploring the ideas and meaning of the work of other artists, craftspeople and designers they learn about their different roles and about the functions of art, craft and design in their own lives and in different times and cultures.



MATHEMATICS

At ICS, the children are provided with opportunities to develop their ability to calculate fluently, to reason and solve problems through application of knowledge and transferable skills. Mathematics is essential to everyday life which is incorporated through cross curricular links, particularly with STEAM. This gives the children an opportunity to see purpose within Mathematics and use real life examples to deepen their understanding and inform them of the necessity for Mathematics in everyday life.

Mathematics at ICS is taught in mixed ability groups. By doing so the school aims to provide more opportunities for all children to achieve their potential. This is through careful and thorough planning of the whole unit of work as well as modeled teaching and activities provided. Children are encouraged to take ownership of their learning by allowing them to move through the work at a pace appropriate to their ability. Children work independently, in pairs and groups which exposes all children to a higher level of vocabulary and reasoning and provides opportunities for children to be supported and support their peers.

In school we use Abacus, both as a home resource and to inform our in class resources and planning. Abacus has:

  • Over 10,000 resources, activities, plans and assessment tools.
  • An online world for children filled with lively and exciting maths games and rewards that your digital-savvy kids will love.
  • Textbooks and workbooks for independent practice, designed to capture children’s interest and inspire a genuine love of maths.
  • Mastery checkpoint workbooks that support the online mastery checkpoints activities and include space for children to make notes, write their answers and show their workings.

NGRT

What does NGRT do?

Tests not just the ability of pupils to decode what they read, but also to comprehend and apply meaning. It can be used to measure phonemic awareness in less able readers too. NGRT’s adaptive testing means that these tests can be used for pupils of all abilities. Questions change to respond to each child’s performance, so more able pupils can be stretched without making the process intimidating to weaker ones.

What does NGRT tell you?

NGRT shows us the reading ages and the Standard Age Scores of our pupils, so we can introduce extra challenge or interventions to address problems before they impact on performance. There is no more crucial skill for success in any subject than reading, so being able to accurately assess and monitor this is essential. NGRT is proven to deliver a reliable assessment of reading comprehension, set against national benchmarks.

READ WRITE INC

What is Read Write Inc?

Read Write Inc. Phonics teaches children to read accurately and fluently with good comprehension. They learn to form each letter, spell correctly, and compose their ideas step-by-step.

Reading

Children learn the English alphabetic code: first they learn one way to read the 40+ sounds and blend these sounds into words, then learn to read the same sounds with alternative graphemes.

They experience success from the very beginning. Engaging phonic books are closely matched to their increasing knowledge of phonics and ‘tricky’ words and, as children re-read the stories, their fluency increases.

Along with a thought-provoking introduction, prompts for thinking out loud and discussion, children are helped to read with a storyteller’s voice.

Writing

The children write every day, rehearsing out loud what they want to say, before spelling the words using the graphemes and ‘tricky’ words they know.

They practice handwriting every day: sitting at a table comfortably, they learn correct letter formation and how to join letters quickly and legibly.

Children’s composition (ideas, vocabulary and grammar) is developed by drawing on their own experiences and talking about the stories they read.

How is Read Write Inc. Phonics organized?

  • 4 to 8-year-old children
  • 40 minutes a day
  • Taught by teachers 
  • 4 to 30 grouped according to progress
  • Half-termly assessments

SCIENCE

The vision of ICS is that every child believes they are a scientist - a creator of thoughts, ideas, explanations and questions to explore. The ICS schools aims to stimulate a child’s curiosity to gain an understanding of natural phenomena; developing children’s scientific knowledge and an understanding of the world around them. Learning opportunities in science allow children to develop reasoning and thinking skills to problem solve, communicate effectively, work cooperatively and use technology to become 21st Century learners. Children learn to ask scientific questions and begin to appreciate the way science will affect their future on a personal, national, and global level. Science is at the core of learning at ICS. It is taught as part of our topic units and in dedicated Science lessons in the Lab and in classrooms.

The aims of science are to enable children to:

  • Ask and answer scientific questions
  • Making predictions
  • Develop skills through scientific enquiry and plan investigations
  • Use appropriate scientific equipment to aid enquiry, including technology
  • Evaluate evidence
  • Present their conclusions clearly and accurately
  • Know and understand the life processes of living things
  • Know and understand materials and their properties know and understand the physical processes of materials, electricity, light, sound and natural forces
  • Know about the nature of the solar system, including the earth
  • Understand current world issues such as Global Warming/Environmental changes including Recycling and how to reduce their Carbon Footprint

The contribution of Science to teaching in other curriculum areas:

The ICS recognises that students today will need to acquire skills in an ever evolving social, economic and culturally diverse world. The Science curriculum has been developed to incorporate cross curricular links through the implementation of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Maths) based learning projects. Through this the children engage in critical thinking, problem solving and develop their entrepreneurial skills. Children love to explore, create and collaborate!

  • English: Science contributes significantly to the teaching of English by actively promoting the skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Some of the texts that the children study in English are of a scientific nature.
  • Technology: Science is used in lessons to collect, record, analyse and present data. Children share their learning collaboratively through various media including Google Classroom.
  • Art: Science projects involve an element of design in the process. Children apply their creative side in the development of these ideas linked to their scientific understanding.
  • Mathematics: Science contributes to the teaching of mathematics in a number of ways. Children apply their knowledge of statistics, measures and graphs to scientific enquiry which allows them master these mathematical skills. Through working on investigations they learn to estimate and predict and record their results in a variety of different ways.

USEFUL LINKS

SOME USEFUL FILES

Please note that ICS cannot be held accountable for any of the content on these websites. We highly recommend that you check the content before allowing your children to use these resources.

 

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION LINKS
Maths Children can use their log-ins to access games their teacher has allocated to them on Abacus. 

 Link

Active Learn Primary

Maths

For interactive games relating to all areas of mathematics.  Select maths and the key stage your child is in.

Search the website for Diennes.  Here you will find base ten equipment to help your children with place value.

Search the website for place value to find interactive arrow cards to use with your children.

 Link

Top Marks

Maths

Select primary, the key stage your child is in and maths.  The website has a number of video clips to help the children’s understanding.

 Link

BBC Bitesize

Maths

This website is useful for understanding the different concepts of mathematics.  It also has a maths dictionary to help with any unfamiliar vocabulary.

 Link

Math Is Fun

Maths 

Hold the drop down arrow over maths and select mental starters.  Here you will find a number of ideas for mental maths games you can play with your children.

 Link

Teaching Idea

Maths

Several interactive games which cover all areas of maths.

 Link

PBS Kids Cybercause

Maths

Generating worksheets with answer key. It is useful to practice more at home. (KS3)

 Link

Maths Aids

Maths

Generating times tables tests for practicing times tables facts. (KS3)

 Link

TimeTables

English Children can use their log-ins to access games their teacher has allocated to them on Bug Club. 

 Link

Active Learn Bug Club

English Additional reading site

 Link

Oxford Owl

English  Read Write Inc Phonics

 Link

Read Write Inc. Phonics

English  Website suitable for all year levels to understand British Curriculum

 Link

Department Of Education

English  Videos on how to pronounce phonic letter sounds and digraph sounds

 Link

Jolly Phonics

ICT/Computing Scratch is a free programming language and online community where students can create their own interactive stories, games, and animations.

 Link

Scratch

ICT/Computing A website that will help students to learn basic computer science with suite of classroom-ready courses for different ages (even kindergarten). Lessons blend game-like tutorials with unplugged classroom activities, and short video lectures with Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Angry Birds and more. Learn repeat-loops, conditionals, algorithms, functions, and variables.

 Link

Code

ICT/Computing CodeCombat is a game-based computer science program where students type real code and see their characters react in real time.

 Link

Code Combat

ICT/Computing NSTeens.org is a website designed for tweens (ages 8-12) with videos and games that teach them about Internet safety in a fun, age-appropriate way. This website also houses Real-Life Stories videos best suited for ages 11-17.

 Link

Ns Teens

ICT/Computing CodeSpark Academy uses a patent pending "no words" interface to teach the basics of computer programming through a variety of interactive learning activities including puzzles, games, step-by-step creative projects, game design and offline printables. It is aimed for ages 4 to 10.

 Link

Code Spark

ICT/Computing A website where students can learn touch typing online using TypingClub's free typing courses. It includes 650 typing games, typing tests and videos.

 Link

Typing Club

ICT/Computing LightBot is a puzzle game based on coding; it secretly teaches programming logic as students play!

 Link

Light Bot

ICT/Computing Robo Garden is an e-learning game that enables students from grade 1 through 9 to learn how to code using the 'Visual Blocky System'. The platform further integrates with educators to be used in classrooms and with parents to monitor child progress.

 Link

Robo Garden

ICT/Computing Bitesize is the BBC's free online study support resource for school-age students in the United Kingdom. It is designed to aid students in both schoolwork and, for older students, exams. It helps with y homework, revision and learning. It has free videos, step-by-step guides, activities and quizzes by level and subject.

 Link

BBC Bitesize

ICT/Computing  A read–eval–print loop (REPL), also termed an interactive toplevel or language shell, is a simple, interactive computer programming environment that takes single user inputs (i.e., single expressions), evaluates them, and returns the result to the user; a program written in a REPL environment is executed piecewise.

 Link

Repl - Python

 

ART & DESIGN

Students will be taught:

Art

  • to use a range of techniques to record their observations in sketchbooks, journals and other media as a basis for exploring their ideas
  • to use a range of techniques and media, including painting
  • to increase their proficiency in the handling of different materials
  • to analyse and evaluate their own work, and that of others, in order to strengthen the visual impact or applications of their work
  • about the history of art, craft, design and architecture, including periods, styles and major movements from ancient times up to the present day.

Design and Technology:

  • Through a variety of creative and practical activities, students will be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an interactive process of designing and making. They should work in a range of domestic and local contexts [for example, the home, health, leisure and culture], and industrial contexts [for example, engineering, manufacturing, construction, food, energy, agriculture (including horticulture) and fashion].

BIOLOGY

Students will be taught about: 

Structure and function of living organisms:

  • Cells and organisation:
    • cells as the fundamental unit of living organisms, including how to observe, interpret and record cell structure using a light microscope
    • the functions of the cell wall, cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondria and chloroplast
    • the similarities and differences between plant and animal cells
    • the role of diffusion in the movement of materials in and between cells
    • the structural adaptations of some unicellular organisms
    • the hierarchical organisation of multicellular organisms: from cells to tissues to organs to systems to organisms. 
  • The skeletal and muscular systems:
    • the structure and functions of the human skeleton, to include support, protection, movement and making blood cells
    • biomechanics – the interaction between skeleton and muscles, including the measurement of force exerted by different muscles
    • the function of muscles and examples of antagonistic muscles. 
  • Nutrition and digestion:
    • content of a healthy human diet: carbohydrates, lipids (fats and oils), proteins, vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and water, and why each is needed
    • calculations of energy requirements in a healthy daily diet
    • the consequences of imbalances in the diet, including obesity, starvation and deficiency diseases
    • the tissues and organs of the human digestive system, including adaptations to function and how the digestive system digests food (enzymes simply as biological catalysts)
    • the importance of bacteria in the human digestive system
    • plants making carbohydrates in their leaves by photosynthesis and gaining mineral nutrients and water from the soil via their roots. 
  • Gas exchange systems:
    • the structure and functions of the gas exchange system in humans, including adaptations to function
    • the mechanism of breathing to move air in and out of the lungs, using a pressure model to explain the movement of gases, including simple measurements of lung volume
    • the impact of exercise, asthma and smoking on the human gas exchange system
    • the role of leaf stomata in gas exchange in plants. 
  • Reproduction:
    • reproduction in humans (as an example of a mammal), including the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, menstrual cycle (without details of hormones), gametes, fertilisation, gestation and birth, to include the effect of maternal lifestyle on the foetus through the placenta
    • reproduction in plants, including flower structure, wind and insect pollination, fertilization, seed and fruit formation and dispersal, including quantitative investigation of some dispersal mechanisms. 
  • Health:
    • the effects of recreational drugs (including substance misuse) on behaviour, health and life processes. 

Material cycles and energy:

  • Photosynthesis:
    • the reactants in, and products of, photosynthesis, and a word summary for photosynthesis
    • the dependence of almost all life on Earth on the ability of photosynthetic organisms, such as plants and algae, to use sunlight in photosynthesis to build organic molecules that are an essential energy store and to maintain levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
    • the adaptations of leaves for photosynthesis.
  • Cellular respiration:
    • aerobic and anaerobic respiration in living organisms, including the breakdown of organic molecules to enable all the other chemical processes necessary for life
    • a word summary for aerobic respiration
    • the process of anaerobic respiration in humans and micro-organisms, including fermentation, and a word summary for anaerobic respiration
    • the differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration in terms of the reactants, the products formed and the implications for the organism.

Interactions and interdependencies: 

  • Relationships in an ecosystem:
    • the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem, including food webs and insect pollinated crops
    • the importance of plant reproduction through insect pollination in human food security
    • how organisms affect, and are affected by, their environment, including the accumulation of toxic materials. 

Genetics and evolution:

  • Inheritance, chromosomes, DNA and genes:
    • heredity as the process by which genetic information is transmitted from one generation to the next
    • a simple model of chromosomes, genes and DNA in heredity, including the part played by Watson, Crick, Wilkins and Franklin in the development of the DNA model
    • differences between species
    • the variation between individuals within a species being continuous or discontinuous, to include measurement and graphical representation of variation
    • the variation between species and between individuals of the same species means some organisms compete more successfully, which can drive natural selection
    • changes in the environment may leave individuals within a species, and some entire species, less well adapted to compete successfully and reproduce, which in turn may lead to extinction
    • the importance of maintaining biodiversity and the use of gene banks to preserve hereditary material.

CHEMISTRY

Students will be taught about: 

The particular nature of matter:

  • the properties of the different states of matter (solid, liquid and gas) in terms of the particle model, including gas pressure
  • changes of state in terms of the particle model.

Atoms, elements and compounds:

  • a simple (Dalton) atomic model
  • differences between atoms, elements and compounds
  • chemical symbols and formulae for elements and compounds
  • conservation of mass changes of state and chemical reactions.

Pure and impure substances:

  • the concept of a pure substance
  • mixtures, including dissolving
  • diffusion in terms of the particle model
  • simple techniques for separating mixtures: filtration, evaporation, distillation and chromatography
  • the identification of pure substances.

Chemical reactions:

  • chemical reactions as the rearrangement of atoms
  • representing chemical reactions using formulae and using equations
  • combustion, thermal decomposition, oxidation and displacement reactions
  • defining acids and alkalis in terms of neutralisation reactions
  • the pH scale for measuring acidity/alkalinity; and indicators
  • reactions of acids with metals to produce a salt plus hydrogen
  • reactions of acids with alkalis to produce a salt plus water
  • what catalysts do.

Energetics:

  • energy changes on changes of state (qualitative)
  • exothermic and endothermic chemical reactions (qualitative).

The Periodic Table:

  • the varying physical and chemical properties of different elements
  • the principles underpinning the Mendeleev Periodic Table
  • the Periodic Table: periods and groups; metals and non-metals
  • how patterns in reactions can be predicted with reference to the Periodic Table
  • the properties of metals and non-metals
  • the chemical properties of metal and non-metal oxides with respect to acidity.

Materials:

  • the order of metals and carbon in the reactivity series
  • the use of carbon in obtaining metals from metal oxides
  • properties of ceramics, polymers and composites (qualitative).

Earth and atmosphere:

  • the composition of the Earth
  • the structure of the Earth
  • the rock cycle and the formation of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks
  • Earth as a source of limited resources and the efficacy of recycling
  • the carbon cycle
  • the composition of the atmosphere
  • the production of carbon dioxide by human activity and the impact on climate.

COMPUTING

Students will be taught to:

  • design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems
  • understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem
  • use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures [for example, lists, tables or arrays]; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions
  • understand simple Boolean logic [for example, AND, OR and NOT] and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers [for example, binary addition, and conversion between binary and decimal]
  • understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits
  • undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users
  • create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability
  • understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.

CURRICULUM GUIDANCE

UK DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION - PDF DOWNLOADS

English Link
Mathematics Link
Science Link
Art and Design Link
Computing Link
Design and Technology Link
Geography Link
History Link
Languages Link
Music Link
Physical Education Link

ENGLISH

Reading

Students will be taught to:

  • Develop an appreciation and love of reading, and read increasingly challenging material independently through:  
    • Reading a wide range of fiction and non-fiction, including in particular whole books, short stories, poems and plays with a wide coverage of genres, historical periods, forms and authors. The range will include high-quality works from: 
      • English literature, both pre-1914 and contemporary, including prose, poetry and drama
      • Shakespeare (two plays)
      • Seminal world literature
    • Choosing and reading books independently for challenge, interest and enjoyment.  
    • Re-reading books encountered earlier to increase familiarity with them and provide a basis for making comparisons.
  • Understand increasingly challenging texts through:  
    • Learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries
    • Making inferences and referring to evidence in the text
    • Knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension
    • Checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.
  • Read critically through:
    • knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning
    • Recognising a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used
    • Studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these
    • Understanding how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play
    • Making critical comparisons across texts
    • Studying a range of authors, including at least two authors in depth each year. 

Writing 

Students will be taught to:

  • Write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure and information through:
    • Writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences, including:
      • Well-structured formal expository and narrative essays
      • Stories, scripts, poetry and other imaginative writing
      • Notes and polished scripts for talks and presentations
      • A range of other narrative and non-narrative texts, including arguments, and personal and formal letters
    • Summarising and organising material, and supporting ideas and arguments with any necessary factual detail 
    • Applying their growing knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and text structure to their writing and selecting the appropriate form
    • Drawing on knowledge of literary and rhetorical devices from their reading and listening to enhance the impact of their writing 
  • Plan, draft, edit and proof-read through:
    • Considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended
    • Amending the vocabulary, grammar and structure of their writing to improve its coherence and overall effectiveness
    • Paying attention to accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling; applying the spelling patterns and rules set out in English Appendix 1 to key stage 1 and 2 programmes of study for English

Grammar and vocabulary

 Students will be taught to:

  • Consolidate and build on their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary through: 
    • Extending and applying the grammatical knowledge set out in English Appendix 2 to key stage 1 and 2 programmes of study to analyse more challenging texts
    • Studying the effectiveness and impact of the grammatical features of the texts they read
    • Drawing on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and using these consciously in their writing and speech to achieve particular effects
    • Knowing and understanding the differences between spoken and written language, including differences associated with formal and informal registers, and between Standard English and other varieties of English
    • Using Standard English confidently in their own writing and speech 
    • Discussing reading, writing and spoken language with precise and confident use of linguistic and literary terminology

Spoken English

Students will be taught to:  

  • Speak confidently and effectively, including through:
    • Using Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion
    • Giving short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point
    • Participating in formal debates and structured discussions, summarising and/or building on what has been said
    • Improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and poetry in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

HOMEWORK

In Key Stage 3, there are three types of homework:

  • Daily homework: It is assigned by the teachers during the lessons; students will have to make their own notes using their (HSCBs) Home School Communication Books.
  • Weekly homework: It is posted every Thursday after school via the specific year Google Site. The due date for the weekly homework is the next Tuesday unless otherwise stated. Assessments are also assigned in the weekly homework schedule. Weekly resources for subjects are also posted on Google Sites every Thursday.
    • Links for the Google Sites:

Year 7: https://sites.google.com/icschool-uae.com/year-7/home 

Year 8: https://sites.google.com/icschool-uae.com/year8/home 

Year 9: https://sites.google.com/icschool-uae.com/year-9/home 

  • Google Classroom homework: Teacher assign homework for the students over their subjects Google Classrooms by their teachers. 

HUMANITIES

Geography:

Students will consolidate and extend their knowledge of the world’s major countries and their physical and human features. They will understand how geographical processes interact to create distinctive human and physical landscapes that change over time. In doing so, they will become aware of increasingly complex geographical systems in the world around them. They will develop greater competence in using geographical knowledge, approaches and concepts [such as models and theories] and geographical skills in analysing and interpreting different data sources. In this way students will continue to enrich their locational knowledge and spatial and environmental understanding.

History:

Students will extend and deepen their chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, so that it provides a well-informed context for wider learning. Students will identify significant events, make connections, draw contrasts, and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time. They will use historical terms and concepts in increasingly sophisticated ways. They will pursue historically valid enquiries including some they have framed themselves, and create relevant, structured and evidentially supported accounts in response. They will understand how different types of historical sources are used rigorously to make historical claims and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.

LANGUAGES

Grammar and vocabulary:

Students will be taught to:

  • identify and use tenses or other structures which convey the present, past, and future as appropriate to the language being studied
  • use and manipulate a variety of key grammatical structures and patterns, including voices and moods, as appropriate
  • develop and use a wide-ranging and deepening vocabulary that goes beyond their immediate needs and interests, allowing them to give and justify opinions and take part in Discussion about wider issues
  • use accurate grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Linguistic competence:

Students will be taught to:

  • listen to a variety of forms of spoken language to obtain information and respond appropriately
  • transcribe words and short sentences that they hear with increasing accuracy
  • initiate and develop conversations, coping with unfamiliar language and unexpected responses, making use of important social conventions such as formal modes of address
  • express and develop ideas clearly and with increasing accuracy, both orally and in writing
  • speak coherently and confidently, with increasingly accurate pronunciation and intonation
  • read and show comprehension of original and adapted materials from a range of different sources, understanding the purpose, important ideas and details, and provide an accurate English translation of short, suitable material
  • read literary texts in the language [such as stories, songs, poems and letters], to stimulate ideas, develop creative expression and expand understanding of the language and culture
  • write prose using an increasingly wide range of grammar and vocabulary, write creatively to express their own ideas and opinions, and translate short written text accurately into the foreign language.

MATHEMATICS

Numbers

Students will be taught to:

  • Understand and use place value for decimals, measures and integers of any size
  • Order positive and negative integers, decimals and fractions; use the number line as a model for ordering of the real numbers; use the symbols =, ≠, <, >, ≤, ≥
  • Use the concepts and vocabulary of prime numbers, factors (or divisors), multiples, common factors, common multiples, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, prime factorization, including using product notation and the unique factorization property
  • Use the four operations, including formal written methods, applied to integers, decimals, proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers, all both positive and negative
  • Use conventional notation for the priority of operations, including brackets, powers, roots and reciprocals
  • Recognise and use relationships between operations including inverse operations
  • Use integer powers and associated real roots (square, cube and higher), recognise powers of 2, 3, 4, 5 and distinguish between exact representations of roots and their decimal approximations
  • Interpret and compare numbers in standard form A x 10n 1≤A<10, where n is a positive or negative integer or zero
  • Work interchangeably with terminating decimals and their corresponding fractions (such as 3.5 and 72 or 0.375 and 38)
  • Define percentage as ‘number of parts per hundred’, interpret percentages and percentage changes as a fraction or a decimal, interpret these multiplicatively, express one quantity as a percentage of another, compare two quantities using percentages, and work with percentages greater than 100%
  • Interpret fractions and percentages as operators
  • Use standard units of mass, length, time, money and other measures, including with decimal quantities
  • Round numbers and measures to an appropriate degree of accuracy [for example, to a number of decimal places or significant figures]
  • Use approximation through rounding to estimate answers and calculate possible resulting errors expressed using inequality notation a<x≤b
  • Use a calculator and other technologies to calculate results accurately and then interpret them appropriately
  • Appreciate the infinite nature of the sets of integers, real and rational numbers.

Algebra

Pupils will be taught to:

  • use and interpret algebraic notation, including:
    • ab in place of a × b
    • 3y in place of y + y + y and 3 × y
    • a2 in place of a × a, a3 in place of a × a × a; a2b in place of a × a × b
    • ab in place of a ÷ b
    • coefficients written as fractions rather than as decimals
    • brackets
  • substitute numerical values into formulae and expressions, including scientific formulae
  • understand and use the concepts and vocabulary of expressions, equations, inequalities, terms and factors
  • simplify and manipulate algebraic expressions to maintain equivalence by:
    • collecting like terms
    • multiplying a single term over a bracket
    • taking out common factors
    • expanding products of two or more binomials
  • understand and use standard mathematical formulae; rearrange formulae to change the subject
  • model situations or procedures by translating them into algebraic expressions or formulae and by using graphs
  • use algebraic methods to solve linear equations in one variable (including all forms that require rearrangement)
  • work with coordinates in all four quadrants
  • recognise, sketch and produce graphs of linear and quadratic functions of one variable with appropriate scaling, using equations in x and y and the Cartesian plane
  • interpret mathematical relationships both algebraically and graphically
  • reduce a given linear equation in two variables to the standard form y = mx + c; calculate and interpret gradients and intercepts of graphs of such linear equations numerically, graphically and algebraically
  • use linear and quadratic graphs to estimate values of y for given values of x and vice versa and to find approximate solutions of simultaneous linear equations
  • find approximate solutions to contextual problems from given graphs of a variety of functions, including piece-wise linear, exponential and reciprocal graphs
  • generate terms of a sequence from either a term-to-term or a position-to-term rule
  • recognise arithmetic sequences and find the nth term
  • recognise geometric sequences and appreciate other sequences that arise.

Ratio, proportion and rates of change

Pupils will be taught to:

  • change freely between related standard units [for example time, length, area, volume/capacity, mass]
  • use scale factors, scale diagrams and maps
  • express one quantity as a fraction of another, where the fraction is less than 1 and greater than 1
  • use ratio notation, including reduction to simplest form
  • divide a given quantity into two parts in a given part:part or part:whole ratio; express the division of a quantity into two parts as a ratio
  • understand that a multiplicative relationship between two quantities can be expressed as a ratio or a fraction
  • relate the language of ratios and the associated calculations to the arithmetic of fractions and to linear functions
  • solve problems involving percentage change, including: percentage increase, decrease and original value problems and simple interest in financial mathematics
  • solve problems involving direct and inverse proportion, including graphical and algebraic representations
  • use compound units such as speed, unit pricing and density to solve problems.

Geometry and measures

Pupils will be taught to:

  • derive and apply formulae to calculate and solve problems involving: perimeter and area of triangles, parallelograms, trapezia, volume of cuboids (including cubes) and other prisms (including cylinders)
  • calculate and solve problems involving: perimeters of 2-D shapes (including circles), areas of circles and composite shapes
  • draw and measure line segments and angles in geometric figures, including interpreting scale drawings
  • derive and use the standard ruler and compass constructions (perpendicular bisector of a line segment, constructing a perpendicular to a given line from/at a given point, bisecting a given angle); recognise and use the perpendicular distance from a point to a line as the shortest distance to the line
  • describe, sketch and draw using conventional terms and notations: points, lines, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, right angles, regular polygons, and other polygons that are reflectively and rotationally symmetric
  • use the standard conventions for labelling the sides and angles of triangle ABC, and know and use the criteria for congruence of triangles
  • derive and illustrate properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, and other plane figures [for example, equal lengths and angles] using appropriate language and technologies
  • identify properties of, and describe the results of, translations, rotations and reflections applied to given figures
  • identify and construct congruent triangles, and construct similar shapes by enlargement, with and without coordinate grids
  • apply the properties of angles at a point, angles at a point on a straight line, vertically opposite angles
  • understand and use the relationship between parallel lines and alternate and corresponding angles
  • derive and use the sum of angles in a triangle and use it to deduce the angle sum in any polygon, and to derive properties of regular polygons
  • apply angle facts, triangle congruence, similarity and properties of quadrilaterals to derive results about angles and sides, including Pythagoras’ Theorem, and use known results to obtain simple proofs
  • use Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometric ratios in similar triangles to solve problems involving right-angled triangles
  • use the properties of faces, surfaces, edges and vertices of cubes, cuboids, prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones and spheres to solve problems in 3-D
  • interpret mathematical relationships both algebraically and geometrically.

Probability

Pupils will be taught to:

  • record, describe and analyse the frequency of outcomes of simple probability experiments involving randomness, fairness, equally and unequally likely outcomes, using appropriate language and the 0-1 probability scale
  • understand that the probabilities of all possible outcomes sum to 1
  • enumerate sets and unions/intersections of sets systematically, using tables, grids and Venn diagrams
  • generate theoretical sample spaces for single and combined events with equally likely, mutually exclusive outcomes and use these to calculate theoretical probabilities.

Statistics

Pupils will be taught to:

  • describe, interpret and compare observed distributions of a single variable through: appropriate graphical representation involving discrete, continuous and grouped data; and appropriate measures of central tendency (mean, mode, median) and spread (range, consideration of outliers)
  • construct and interpret appropriate tables, charts, and diagrams, including frequency tables, bar charts, pie charts, and pictograms for categorical data, and vertical line (or bar) charts for ungrouped and grouped numerical data
  • describe simple mathematical relationships between two variables (bivariate data) in observational and experimental contexts and illustrate using scatter graphs.

MUSIC

Students will be taught to:

  • play and perform confidently in a range of solo and ensemble contexts using their voice, playing instruments musically, fluently and with accuracy and expression
  • improvise and compose; and extend and develop musical ideas by drawing on a range of musical structures, styles, genres and traditions
  • use staff and other relevant notations appropriately and accurately in a range of musical styles, genres and traditions
  • identify and use the inter-related dimensions of music expressively and with increasing sophistication, including use of tonalities, different types of scales and other musical devices
  • listen with increasing discrimination to a wide range of music from great composers and musicians
  • develop a deepening understanding of the music that they perform and to which they listen, and its history.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Students will be taught to:

  • use a range of tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in direct competition through team and individual games [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders, rugby and tennis]
  • develop their technique and improve their performance in other competitive sports [for example, athletics and gymnastics]
  • perform dances using advanced dance techniques within a range of dance styles and forms
  • take part in outdoor and adventurous activities which present intellectual and physical challenges and be encouraged to work in a team, building on trust and developing skills to solve problems, either individually or as a group
  • analyse their performances compared to previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best
  • take part in competitive sports and activities outside school through community links or sports clubs.

PHYSICS

Students will be taught about: 

Energy

  • Calculation of fuel uses and costs in the domestic context:
    • comparing energy values of different foods (from labels) (kJ)
    • comparing power ratings of appliances in watts (W, kW)
    • comparing amounts of energy transferred (J, kJ, kW hour)
    • domestic fuel bills, fuel use and costs
    • fuels and energy resources.
  • Energy changes and transfers:
    • simple machines give bigger force but at the expense of smaller movement (and vice versa): product of force and displacement unchanged
    • heating and thermal equilibrium: temperature difference between two objects leading to energy transfer from the hotter to the cooler one, through contact (conduction) or radiation; such transfers tending to reduce the temperature difference: use of insulators
    • other processes that involve energy transfer: changing motion, dropping an object, completing an electrical circuit, stretching a spring, metabolism of food, burning fuels. 
  • Changes in systems:
    • energy as a quantity that can be quantified and calculated; the total energy has the same value before and after a change
    • comparing the starting with the final conditions of a system and describing increases and decreases in the amounts of energy associated with movements, temperatures, changes in positions in a field, in elastic distortions and in chemical compositions
    • using physical processes and mechanisms, rather than energy, to explain the intermediate steps that bring about such changes.

Motion and forces

  • Describing motion:
    • speed and the quantitative relationship between average speed, distance and time (speed = distance ÷ time)
    • the representation of a journey on a distance-time graph
    • relative motion: trains and cars passing one another. 
  • Forces:
    • forces as pushes or pulls, arising from the interaction between two objects
    • using force arrows in diagrams, adding forces in one dimension, balanced and unbalanced forces
    • moment as the turning effect of a force
    • forces: associated with deforming objects; stretching and squashing – springs; with rubbing and friction between surfaces, with pushing things out of the way; resistance to motion of air and water
    • forces measured in newtons, measurements of stretch or compression as force is changed
    • force-extension linear relation; Hooke’s Law as a special case
    • work done and energy changes on deformation
    • non-contact forces: gravity forces acting at a distance on Earth and in space, forces between magnets and forces due to static electricity.
  • Pressure in fluids:
    • atmospheric pressure, decreases with increase of height as weight of air above decreases with height
    • pressure in liquids, increasing with depth; upthrust effects, floating and sinking
    • pressure measured by ratio of force over area – acting normal to any surface.
  • Balanced forces:
    • opposing forces and equilibrium: weight held by stretched spring or supported on a compressed surface.
  • Forces and motion:
    • forces being needed to cause objects to stop or start moving, or to change their speed or direction of motion (qualitative only)
    • change depending on direction of force and its size.

Waves

  • Observed waves:
    • waves on water as undulations which travel through water with transverse motion; these waves can be reflected, and add or cancel – superposition.
  • Sound waves:
    • frequencies of sound waves, measured in hertz (Hz); echoes, reflection and absorption of sound
    • sound needs a medium to travel, the speed of sound in air, in water, in solids
    • sound produced by vibrations of objects, in loud speakers, detected by their effects on microphone diaphragm and the ear drum; sound waves are longitudinal
    • auditory range of humans and animals.
  • Energy and waves:
    • pressure waves transferring energy; use for cleaning and physiotherapy by ultra-sound; waves transferring information for conversion to electrical signals by microphone.
  • Light waves:
    • the similarities and differences between light waves and waves in matter
    • light waves traveling through a vacuum; speed of light
    • the transmission of light through materials: absorption, diffuse scattering and specular reflection at a surface
    • use of ray model to explain imaging in mirrors, the pinhole camera, the refraction of light and action of convex lens in focusing (qualitative); the human eye
    • light transferring energy from source to absorber leading to chemical and electrical effects; photo-sensitive material in the retina and in cameras
    • colours and the different frequencies of light, white light and prisms (qualitative only); differential colour effects in absorption and diffuse reflection.

Electricity and electromagnetism:

  • Current electricity:
    • electric current, measured in amperes, in circuits, series and parallel circuits, currents add where branches meet and current as flow of charge
    • potential difference, measured in volts, battery and bulb ratings; resistance, measured in ohms, as the ratio of potential difference (p.d.) to current
    • differences in resistance between conducting and insulating components (quantitative).
  • Static electricity:
    • separation of positive or negative charges when objects are rubbed together: transfer of electrons, forces between charged objects
    • the idea of electric field, forces acting across the space between objects not in contact.
  • Magnetism:
    • magnetic poles, attraction and repulsion
    • magnetic fields by plotting with compass, representation by field lines
    • Earth’s magnetism, compass and navigation
    • the magnetic effect of a current, electromagnets, D.C. motors (principles only).

Matter:

  • Physical changes:
    • conservation of material and of mass, and reversibility, in melting, freezing, evaporation, sublimation, condensation, dissolving
    • similarities and differences, including density differences, between solids, liquids and gases
    • Brownian motion in gases
    • diffusion in liquids and gases driven by differences in concentration
    • the difference between chemical and physical changes.
  • Particle model:
    • the differences in arrangements, in motion and in closeness of particles explaining changes of state, shape and density, the anomaly of ice-water transition
    • atoms and molecules as particles.
  • Energy in matter:
    • changes with temperature in motion and spacing of particles
    • internal energy stored in materials.

Space physics:

  • gravity force, weight = mass x gravitational field strength (g), on Earth g=10 N/kg, different on other planets and stars; gravity forces between Earth and Moon, and between Earth and Sun (qualitative only)
  • our Sun as a star, other stars in our galaxy, other galaxies
  • the seasons and the Earth’s tilt, day length at different times of year, in different hemispheres
  • the light year as a unit of astronomical distance.

USEFUL EXTERNAL LINKS

SOME USEFUL FILES

Please note that ICS cannot be held accountable for any of the content on these websites. We highly recommend that you check the content before allowing your children to use these resources.

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION LINKS
General
  • Topmarks is a leading independent educational website for children, teaching professionals and parents.
  • Topmarks gives children the opportunity to learn online, through safe, fun and engaging games and activities.
  • Topmarks helps teachers and parents save time finding the best, inspirational educational web resources.

Link

TOPMARK 

General

Bitesize is the BBC's free online study support resource for school-age students in the United Kingdom. It is designed to aid students in both school work and, for older students, exams. It helps with homework, revision and learning. It has free videos, step-by-step guides, activities and quizzes by level and subject.

Link

BITESIZE

Mathematics

This website is useful for understanding the different concepts of mathematics. It also has a maths dictionary to help with any unfamiliar vocabulary.

 

Link

MATH IS FUN

Mathematics Math-Aids.Com is a free resource where you can make an unlimited number of printable math worksheets to be used at home for extra practice.

Link

Math-Aids

Mathematics

Test your times tables skills with our configurable online times tables tests. Includes division times tables.

Link

Timestables UK

Mathematics

At timestables.co.uk you can easily practise all of your tables. The arithmetic problems are clear and simple so you can immediately get started on practicing your tables. Select one of the times tables you wish to practise and show what you can do on the speed test, Multiplication Tables Check or printout great worksheets.

Link

Timestables UK

Mathematics Great instructional videos from timetables, all the way up to KS3.

Link

Youtube

Mathematics Examples to read and examples to try for all KS3 Maths topic areas.

Link

BBC

Computing

Scratch is a free programming language and online community where students can create their own interactive stories, games, and animations.

Link

Scratch MIT

Computing A website that will help students to learn basic computer science with suite of classroom-ready courses for different ages (even kindergarten). Lessons blend game-like tutorials with unplugged classroom activities, and short video lectures with Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Angry Birds and more. Learn repeat-loops, conditionals, algorithms, functions, and variables.

Link

Code

Computing

CodeCombat is a game-based computer science program where students type real code and see their characters react in real time.

Link

Code Combat

Computing

NSTeens.org is a website designed for tweens (ages 8-12) with videos and games that teach them about Internet safety in a fun, age-appropriate way. This website also houses Real-Life Stories videos best suited for ages 11-17.

Link

NSTEENS

Computing A website where students can learn touch typing online using TypingClub's free typing courses. It includes 650 typing games, typing tests and videos.

Link

Typing Club

Computing RoboGarden is an e-learning game that enables students from grade 1 through 9 to learn how to code using the 'Visual Blocky System'. The platform further integrates with educators to be used in classrooms and with parents to monitor child's progress.

Link

Robograden

Computing A read–eval–print loop (REPL), also termed an interactive toplevel or language shell, is a simple, interactive computer programming environment that takes single user inputs (i.e., single expressions), evaluates them, and returns the result to the user; a program written in a REPL environment is executed piecewise.

Link

Lang Python

Computing CS First is one of many Google initiatives focused on computer science education. It is a free computer science curriculum that makes coding easy to teach and fun to learn through Scratch.

Link

Google CS First

Music

Music theory worksheets

Link

Music Theory

French Free lessons; exercises and classes to learn French for the starters and elementary

Link

Francaisfacile

Science

BrainPOP offers educational animated videos and lessons covering different science topics. Each featured science topic comes with illustrative videos, quizzes, and accompanying activities.

Link

Brainpop

Science Enjoy fun science games for kids while learning more about science and technology. There's a range of free online activities to try with something for everyone whether you're interested in animals, plants, chemistry, biology, physics, space, magnets, electricity, forces, light, sound, gases or other science related topics.

Link

Science kids

Humanities National Geographic shows wonderful images and videos about various geographical topics which could be used to revise what has already been studied in class or to answer any pressing questions you might have.

Link

National Geographic

English Tons of free, ready-to-print resources including leveled reading passages, differentiated texts, vocabulary lists, and assessments.

Link

Readworks

English

This fantastic digital library service provides a powerful sense of independence for students with print-related disabilities.

Link

Bookshare

English

Standards-aligned content across subject areas allows for targeted reading instruction via leveled reading passages and thorough comprehension activities.

Link

Readworks

English

TweenTribune's questions and quizzes can help kids follow and understand the news.

Link

TweenTribune

English

Up-to-date, high-interest articles meet students right at their level

Link

Newsela

English

With activities, discussion questions, and lots of free access to the books, this site is a great place for Harry Potter fans new and old.

Link

Scholastic

English Excellent opportunities for grammar and writing practice.

Link

Quill

OTHER CURRICULUMS

* Please note that the below links will redirect to ICS head office website



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Phone: +971 2 444 1400
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